How is brand advertising different to direct response advertising?

June 19, 2018By Simon FosterAdvertising Evaluation Training, Advertising Media Training, Direct Marketing Training, DRTV Training, Media Evaluation Training, Media Planning Training, TV Media Planning Training No Comments

Brand advertising techniques are very different to direct response advertising techniques.  Even when you are running an integrated multi-channel campaign it is important to understand the key differences between the two approaches so that you can orchestrate your overall campaign plan and budget to deliver maximum ROI. To illustrate some of the key differences here … Read More

Understanding brand awareness, consideration and preference

February 13, 2018By Simon FosterAdvertising Evaluation Training, Marketing Training, Media Planning Training No Comments

Brand awareness is vitally important in the marketing process. As consumers need to be aware of a product and brand to purchase it, then the more consumers who are aware, the more purchases take place. This hierarchical approach, begins with awareness and moves through consideration and preference to purchase. This hierarchical path is sometimes called … Read More

How do TVRs build media reach and frequency?

January 29, 2018By Simon FosterAdvertising Evaluation Training, Advertising Media Training, DRTV Training, Media Buying Training, Media Planning Training, TV Media Planning Training No Comments

As we saw in the “what is a TVR” post a TVR is a percentage of a given target audience in a given geographic base.  But is a TVR any more than that? Well, yes it is. A TVR is an important factor in calculating how media activity builds reach and frequency. Reach is the … Read More

Advertising Response Rates by Channel

February 15, 2017By Simon FosterAdvertising Evaluation Training, Direct Mail Training, Direct Marketing Training, Media Planning Training No Comments

Understanding response rates by media channel is a vital component of marketing and media planning. If you know the response rates, media costs and likely conversion rates of each channel you are using, you can forecast the ROI of your planned activity – before you spend any budget. This helps to de-risk your marketing activity … Read More

Media ROI Evaluation Techniques

May 30, 2014By Simon FosterAdvertising Evaluation Training, Media Evaluation Training, Media Planning Training

Techniques for tracking advertising and media ROI are often discussed by both advertisers and agencies as they seek to identify and maximise the ROI effect of media budgets. Deciding on which techniques to use can raise a number of issues depending on the data and budgets available for advertising evaluation. Before we get into the techniques themselves … Read More

Facebook ‘likes’ don’t increase brand preference or sales

May 9, 2012By Simon FosterAdvertising Evaluation Training, Digital Media Training, Media Planning Training, Social Media Training

Here’s an iron for the fire: “Facebook ‘likes’ do not cause increased brand preference or increased sales so marketing campaigns designed to increase the number of ‘likes’ are unlikely to increase brand preference or sales.” I was moved to develop and explore this hypothesis after reading an article on the real cost of brand building … Read More

Social Media Metrics Made Simple: Focus on Sales and Customers

February 20, 2012By Simon FosterAdvertising Evaluation Training, Digital Media Training, Media Planning Training, Social Media Training

I am amazed that so many people spend so much time defining and discussing social media metrics. Why? Because the answers marketers (and shareholders) want are very, very simple. Marketers want only one thing from marketing budget investment. Marketers want sales – sales are key; almost everything else is a proxy for some point on … Read More

Advertising Frequency and Diminishing Marginal Utility

December 1, 2008By Simon FosterAdvertising Evaluation Training, Advertising Media Training, Media Evaluation Training, Media Planning Training

Economists have a concept called Diminishing Marginal Utility. This means that each additional time a consumer consumes something they get less satisfaction from consuming it. So, if I have one coffee, I find it very satisfying, two could be OK, but by the time I get to three I’m not getting much additional satisfaction, infact, … Read More